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A word about costs

There's no clear-cut price list for building a new photography website because no two websites are the same.

I don't create assembly-line websites, so I can't possibly state what a new site costs, I don't know what it looks like yet. Costs are influenced a lot by your target audience and how they'll be using the site etc. Therefore, as a professional, I start all design projects with a big questionnaire to fully understand what needs to be done, before I can give you a precise cost & time estimate. The scope of the project (researching & deciding on the best solution for your goals) is the hard part, so I can't post a fixed price online.

But if you need some rough ballpark figures, website makeovers usually range between $1.000 & $3000, and new custom websites start at $5.000.

Smaller web-design services do have a flat fee (for simplicity): a website teardown is $200, an in-depth SEO review is $550, the WP care plan is $150/month, and consulting calls are $120/hour (all expressed in USD).

Except for consulting, I don't work on an hourly basis, I am not selling my time. I work on a per-project basis & try to focus on the quality of the work, instead of rushing things. I don't accept checks or payment plans.

I give fixed project prices in advance, and I don't nickel and dime you with change orders, so we can stay within the initial budget. If needed, we can adapt the quote to your budget by adding or removing functionality.

The price never alters, there are no "surprises" or hidden costs. I want to have an up-front and honest working relationship.

In all honesty, I'm not the cheapest in the industry, nor do I want to be. The quality that I aim for doesn't allow for the prices offered by open marketplaces like Upwork. I don't participate in their race to the bottom.

I'm the person you hire when you need your photography website done right, delivered on time for the right price.

Your photography website is an investment, not an expense

Photographers often feel a resistance toward hiring experts in other industries and allocating a budget for their website. It's natural to try to cut down on costs (especially in today's economy), but a poorly-built site won't give you serious results.

If you want to transition from an expense to an investment mentality, you have to work hard to define your goals first, to get to know who you’re working with (and how to work efficiently with them).

Generic developers perform tasks and focus on their time & output level. So they become an expense and a commodity. Whereas professionals provide solutions and focus mainly on the results they create, so they’re an investment and are worth paying relative to the value they give you.

I specialize in building photography websites and am willing to sit down and understand the "big picture" in your project, so I strive to position myself as a professional and a worthy investment.